What sizes do pool cues come in

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The standard pool cue sizing runs from 57 inches to 58.5 inches in length, with a weight of 18-22 oz. You can also buy custom pool cues that are shorter or longer than the standard sizes, but they are not as common because most people are comfortable using 55-58 inch long pool cues. It is very unlikely you will ever need a cue that is shorter or longer than this range.

Shorter pool cues are typically used by people who have smaller frames, while larger pool players will choose even longer cues to maximize their reach. Someone who is 6′ tall can get away with using a pool cue measuring 59 inches, but anyone taller should consider 60-inch cues so that they can move around the table with ease.

Conversely, anyone under 5’8″ should stick with 55-57 inch cues because longer sticks will cause them to stand too far away from the pool table. A good way to test whether or not you should be using a shorter or longer cue is to lay your arm flat on top of the pool table, palm facing up. If you are shorter than 6″ tall, it’s time to invest in a shorter cue.

What are the different pool cue sizes?

Standard American Pool Cues are 57 inches long and weigh between 18-22 oz, depending on whether or not they have a special weight bolt installed inside of them. Standard cue lengths were created by the Billiard Congress of America (BCA) and are considered to be industry standards.

Most people will only ever come across these standard sizes, but you can also purchase shorter or longer cues that do not conform to the 57-58.5 inch range. Shorter cues are often used by petite players or children, while taller players might like the additional reach that comes with using longer cues.

Standard cues are available in 18-21 oz weight, but you can also find models that weigh more or less than this range. These surplus cue weights offer some customizability most, but people prefer to stick with standard weight ranges because they fit most snooker tables.

What are the best pool cue sizes for beginners?

Most people will only ever need to consider standard American Pool Cues when they are choosing what size of pool cue they should purchase. There is no point in buying a shorter or longer cue if you are comfortable with 57-58.5 inch models since these are industry standards for a reason.

People who are right-handed will usually want to go with cues that are 57 inches in length, while southpaws should stick with 58-inch models. Remember that you can always purchase shorter or longer cues if you find yourself struggling with the requirements of your standard size, but keep in mind these are not industry standards and might not fit in your favorite snooker table.

Anytime someone is buying their first cue, they should always invest in a standard model and find out what they like and dislike about the size before they start making more serious purchases. You can upgrade to custom or weight bolts down the road, but your first cue should be something you are not afraid to fall in love with.

What are the standard pool cue sizes?

57 inches long and weighing between 18-22 oz, these cues are considered to be industry standards and should work for virtually anyone. You can find shorter or longer player cues that will help you cover more ground without sacrificing your aim, but most people will only ever need to consider these standard sizes.

Surplus cue weights are not industry standards, but they offer some players the opportunity to customize their cues by adding or removing weight bolts. If you are on a budget and cannot afford an expensive custom player’s cue right away, it is okay to buy a heavier surplus-weight pool cue you cannot find in your local pool hall.

What are the smallest pool cue sizes?

Smaller players and even children will benefit from using shorter pool cues, which can help improve their accuracy and make it easier to reach the pool table’s pockets. Anyone under 5’8″ should be able to use a 57-inch long cue without any trouble, but those who are significantly shorter or smaller should consider investing in a shorter cue that is between 48-53 inches long.

What are the best pool cue sizes for professionals?

Professional players are not beholden to industry standards, because they have access to custom cues that are specifically designed for their individual needs. Plenty of professional type C players prefer using 57-inch cues, while some professionals need to use longer models that measure between 58-60 inches.

Players who like to use longer cues might want to consider investing in a custom weight bolt cue since these offer better customization than surplus models. After all, there is no reason why you should not upgrade if it will make you more comfortable with your game.

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